Help to Work Launch Event

On Friday 16 June, Kennedy Scott and their partners launched their new Help to Work project with a complimentary seminar in their centre in Brighton.

To celebrate the launch of the new Help to Work project, Kennedy Scott, their project Supply Chain, delivery staff and the Coast to Capital LEP attended Kennedy Scott’s centre in Brighton for an afternoon seminar.

Help to Work is a voluntary programme that gives unemployed and economically inactive adults living in the Coast to Capital LEP region, employability skills and support to help them into work.

The two hour event, which ran from 4-6pm, was split into two separate presentations. Kennedy Scott CEO, Teresa Scott introduced the event, followed by an overview of each organisation within the supply chain. Kennedy Scott gave a live demonstration of their new e-Circle of Support website, a ‘shop for support’ online marketplace and the first of its kind in the Employment industry. This brings together in one place - skills, wellbeing and employment services, specifically for their customers. Participants are given a £100 budget to spend on products/services that can help support them towards employment, giving them responsibility over their journey back to work. These include things like retail vouchers for interview clothing, fitness passes, courses and qualifications. This builds on the companies trademark Circle of Support© model, which co-ordinates a local network of support, including local organisations, GPs, social workers and every relevant person in a jobseekers life to help them to secure and sustain work.

Caseworkers then took it in turns to speak passionately about their first-hand experiences in helping customers on the project to successfully secure work, many with incomprehensible barriers that had previously prevented them from sustaining employment.

One of the success stories shared was that of 32-year-old Russell from Worthing. Russell was unemployed for over 18 months before joining Kennedy Scott’s Help to Work programme, funded by the Department for Work and Pensions and the European Social Fund. He had worked for one single employer in the retail sector since leaving school. Unfortunately, Russell’s step father passed away and a misunderstanding led to him losing his job of 16 years as a Trolley Attendant.

Russell had worked for one single employer in the retail sector since leaving school. Unfortunately, Russell’s step father passed away and a misunderstanding led to him losing his job of 16 years as a Trolley Attendant.

When he first joined, he was suffering with low confidence and low mood. His Caseworker, Taz, worked with him to build a CV fit for purpose, together they worked on transferable skills due to his lack of wider experience, interview techniques and employability skills. Russell has a learning disability and Autism which can affect his body language, his Caseworker worked with him to improve this as it was causing a barrier. His Autism wasn’t diagnosed until after he’d finished education, so he wasn’t well supported in school.

Three months of support led to Russell securing permanent employment with a national retail chain. Since starting back in work, Russell has developed his skillset further and is now multi-trained, working on the tills, in the warehouse and on the shop floor. He is thrilled to be back in employment, well supported by his manager and in addition, receiving ongoing in-work support from his Caseworker at Kennedy Scott. He is more confident, more adaptable to change and very happy in his new role.

One customer said of the support they have received on Help to Work: “My Caseworker really listens to me and my needs, he has helped with my CV and advice on where to seek help with debt problems”.

Whilst another commented: “My advisor is very friendly and is always positive about me going in employment the other staff that I have met are very happy to help”.

For more information, please contact Kennedy Scott via: helptowork@kennedyscott.co.uk, call: 01304 201 213, or visit kennedyscott.co.uk.


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